Canio’s in the New York Times

If you haven’t seen this yet, please read:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/23/nyregion/fighting-to-preserve-sag-harbors-literary-flavor.html?ref=nyregionspecial&_r=0

Be sure to stop in at Canio’s over the holidays and help us “keep Sag Harbor salty!” And tell us what’s happening on your Main Street.

He’s Back! Big white whale sighting at Canio’s

In celebration of our 35th year, we’re planning a special marathon reading of Melville’s Moby Dick.
Canio began the tradition many years ago and due to popular demand, we’re bringing it back. Voices famous and unknown have participated over the years, sometimes reading, or listening in their p.j.s during the wee hours. Plans are now underway for a whale of a celebration, a special anniversary reading with surprises in store, special give-aways and more; contact the shop to be part of this historic event!

Mike’s Last Day

We bid a fond farewell to our dear UPS delivery man, Mr. Mike. Always the professional, Mike had been hefting heavy boxes of books through Canio’s doors for well over 15 years, and we considered him part of the Canio’s team. Dressed in company brown, Mike’s  businesslike demeanor was always pleasant, always courteous. And once in a while, we could get him to crack a smile and chuckle over some silly quip or other.

We wonder just how many pounds of packages he must have delivered during his many long years with the company. The burden didn’t seem to weigh him down, or at least, he didn’t let it show.

Mr. Efficiency would be a fitting nickname for Mike. We could practically set our watches to the sound of his truck brakes as the hulking van pulled up at our curb. That sound would be music to our ears as customers eagerly awaited special orders, especially during  busy summer months and the hectic  holiday season. And on cold, quiet winter afternoons, that sound and Mike’s brief visit were always a welcome part of the day.

In a week or so, another delivery man will be assigned to what we’ve learned is a coveted route. “Everyone here is so nice,” said one temporary delivery guy. Well, we hope so. And we wish “our” Mike (all the shops on Main Street want to claim him their “own”) very well in his new position. He’ll be inside UPS headquarters rather than behind the wheel of the big brown behemoth, warm inside when it’s cold out; dry when it’s lashing; far from  the crazy summer traffic jams, and we hope, comfortable in the good company of his colleagues. Congratulations and all best wishes to #1 Mike!

Beyond our Grandmother’s Gravy

Thanks to years  long hard work and dedication, an English- language edition of the formidable anthology Italoamericana: The Literature of the Great Migration, 1880-1943 has recently been published by Fordham University Press. Originally published in Italian and edited by Francesco Durante, this landmark collection of essays, poems, stories, memoir,  history and more illuminates American society through the eyes of Italian-speaking immigrants. Rich with biographical notes and a helpful introduction, the volume deserves a place on the shelf of any serious student of Italian American literature.

Last Saturday, editor of the American edition, Robert Viscusi offered a comprehensive introduction to the volume he lovingly shepherded into print. Translator Giulia Prestia read selections from a few of the anarchist writers included in the anthology. Reviewing the work in the New York Times, Sam Roberts writes, “‘Recounting first-generation immigrant life in ”the American colony,’ the selections don’t shy away from scabrous subjects, like prejudice, exploitation of women, criminal conduct or radicalism.'” At over 900 pages, we are clearly beyond the stories we heard from our grandmother as she stirred the pot of gravy in her cramped tenement kitchen. The collection has received hearty critical praise and a starred review in Publishers Weekly, which noted, “This volume is a major work and forms an invaluable testament to a forgotten era of Italian literary history in the new world.”

If you missed the event, stop in for a signed copy of the anthology, and stay tuned for the podcast soon to be available at WPKN’s East End Ink blogspot. ( eastendink.blogspot.com)

All 1789 of Miss Emily

One woman came by train from Minnesota, on a sort of pilgrimage, she said. There were the two lovely sisters on their annual reunion. An African American man with a rich sonorous baritone; an elementary school girl from Vermont who recently learned she was a distant relation of the Belle of Amherst.  College students; grandparents; a Chinese woman struggling with pronunciation, as we all sometimes did. An odd choir of devotees, we gathered once again in the parlor of the Dickinson Homestead to read all 1789 of Miss Emily’s poems.

This year’s annual poetry marathon dovetailed with the Amherst Poetry Festival. We heard James Tate,  Doug Anderson and Linelle Moise read from their extraordinary work. Small presses and literary magazines offered their wares at the local park. A tarot reader read from an Emily-themed deck. A flotilla of small rubber duckies bobbed in a nearby fountain, each with an Emily poem tied around its neck. Amherst knows how to celebrate the literary arts and have some fun, too. All this and 500 varieties of beer down at the Moan & Dove. Don’t miss next year’s marathon reading likely in late September when Emily’s newly restored bedroom will be revealed.

Meanwhile, share your favorite Dickinson poem here and keep the marathon going. Then join us in early December for our own Dickinson celebration around her birthday. Who’ll be first to comment?

Canio’s, where good books, ideas, & community meet

CALENDAR of EVENTS

Welcome, Friends of Canio’s, to our “new”  look.  Canio’s has long been a pillar of Sag Harbor’s literary and artistic community with thousands of events over the years within our storied walls.  This October we celebrates our 34th year.  Stay tuned for details of the celebration. The summer of 2014 brings lots of exciting news.  Our calendar is full of events with local & well known writers; and other great events, including the jazz guitarist, Jack Wilkins on July 12.  Check out our listing.

Saving Bookstores, Saving Lives 

James Patterson is giving a million dollars to bookstores for specific projects. We need your help!   Please recommend Canio’s Books for a James Patterson Grant. Here’s how:  go to  jamespatterson.com/booksellers and answer a few questions. That’s it!   Let us know & we’ll keep you posted. Thanks in advance.

TEST our NEW e-book offering

Are you reading e-books on your iPad or iPhone?  If yes, please test our e-book storefront on ZOLA Books. ZOLA is an online e-book purveyor for small Indies. They are building their inventory and have signed many publishers. They don’t carry Random House-Penguin title yet; but this will change soon. In the meantime, give it a try. We’d love your feedback.  

 

It’s simple:   

go to zolabooks.com/profile/caniosbooks,

CLICK the IndiePledge button on our page.  All your purchases will be credited to Canio’s once you make the pledge.

Maryann & Kathryn are offering writing & photography workshops throughout the summer.  Please call or email for information.  Private lessons and editorial services are also available.  Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, but most importantly, come in & see us and discover why Canio’s is where good books, ideas & community meet.

Wrestling Demons

Three books just out challenge us, once again, to confront the evils of the Holocaust: Philip Schultz’ The Wherewithall, a long poem about the Shoah set in 1968 San Francisco and 1941 Poland; Peter Matthiessen’s In Paradise a novel about a group of Buddhists who sit meditation at a selection platform; and Martin Goldsmith’s Alex’s Wake: a Voyage of  Betrayal and a Journey of Remembrance about his family’s odyssey on the SS St. Louis.  All three courageous authors wrestle the demons that continue to disturb us, whether second-generations directly and indirectly effected by The Shoah, or those of us simply citizens of the global village struggling to understand.

These books  deserve our attention. Reading at least would be a fine way to observe Holocaust Remembrance Day ( it begins at sunset April 27 and  concludes at sunset April 28). Which one will you read first?



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